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Clear Liquid Diet (Day 2)

Definition A clear liquid diet consists of clear liquids — such as water, broth and plain gelatin — that are easily digested and leave no undigested residue in your intestinal tract. Your doctor may prescribe a clear liquid diet before certain medical procedures or if you have certain digestive problems. Because a clear liquid diet can’t provide you with adequate calories and nutrients, it shouldn’t be continued for more than a few days. Clear liquids and foods may be colored so long as you are able to see through them. Foods can be considered liquid if they are even partly liquid at room temperature. You can’t eat solid food while on a clear liquid diet. Purpose A clear liquid diet is often used before tests, procedures or surgeries that require no food in your stomach or intestines, such as before colonoscopy. It may also be recommended as a short-term diet if you have certain digestive problems, such as nausea, vomiting or diarrhea, or after certain types of surgery. Diet details A clear liquid diet helps maintain adequate hydration, provides some important electrolytes, such as sodium and potassium, and gives some energy at a time when a full diet isn’t possible or recommended. The following foods are allowed in a clear liquid diet: Water (plain, carbonated or flavored) Fruit juices without pulp, such as apple or white grape Fruit-flavored beverages,...

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Okinawan Wisdom (Day 1)

The Japanese practice something that makes such sense that I can’t believe we don’t start teaching this to our kids. It’s called “hara hachi bu”. It means, eat until you are 80 percent full. You have probably heard about the Okinawan people and how they often live to 100. They are the longest lived, healthiest people on the planet and they practice hara hachi bu. Of course it helps to eat healthy food as well, but simply learning to eat until you are 80 percent full would do wonders for us Americans. Most of us have no idea what 80 percent full feels like. We do know that if we eat until we are full, in 20 minutes we are likely to feel too full, as it takes about that long for the stomach to communicate with the brain just how full it is. But how do you tell when you are “80 percent full”? Here is what registered dietician, Susan Dopart, has to say on the subject: It takes sometimes 15-20 meals to reset the muscle memory of the stomach to get used to less food and people need to trust that will happen. Most are used to eating until full, which is past satiation and which keeps weight on. Susan suggests eating just half of what you normally eat and then checking in to see how you...

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